The Seven Best Seafood Restaurants In Cornwall | Travel


1. The Hidden Hut, Porthcurnick Beach

The Hidden Hut, a wooden beach cafe, is only accessible on foot. Park the car at Portscatho and follow the south west coast path for ten minutes until the track opens onto Porthcurnick beach. Chef and owner Simon Stallard cooked for world leaders at the 2021 G7 summit, but he’s mostly in his element grilling fish caught in the bay. Lunches are a paper plate affair and beach picnics of grilled mackerel and summer salads, but grab a ticket for a night of partying and expect fresh specialties as you watch the sun set. sleep under the ocean. (Mains from £9; hiddenhut.co.uk)

2. Tolcarne Inn, Newlyn

Having spent ten years working in some of Cornwall’s finest restaurants, Ben Tunnicliffe decided to run his own project in 2012, taking over an 18th century boozer from Newlyn. The Tolcarne Inn has a wood-burning stove and rickety tables filled with late-night date couples, but its chalk menu is far fancier. Sourcing ingredients from day boats that land a few hundred yards away, the chef also works with local producers and community farms to create dishes such as ray wing with Cornish early vegetables and fine beans biological. (Main courses from £18.50; tolcarneinn.co.uk)

Behind the scenes of Outlaw's New Road

Behind the scenes of Outlaw’s New Road

3. The New Outlaw Road, Port Isaac

Eagle-eyed people might recognize Port Isaac as the setting of Doc Martin, but in recent years it’s Nathan Outlaw’s name that has become synonymous with the seaside village. The chef’s flagship restaurant, Outlaw’s New Road, incorporates the ocean into every part of the dining experience, from the rugged Cornwall coastline and floor-to-ceiling windows to the Michelin-starred menu that changes with the catch of the day. While you’ll want to wear your rags for New Road, Outlaw’s Fish Kitchen – a short walk away – has a more casual vibe and a slightly cheaper set menu. (New Road menu £105pp; outlaw.co.uk)

Fish House Fistral seafood platter

Fish House Fistral seafood platter

4. The Fishhouse Fistral, Newquay

With its proximity to the sea, a surf shop and a pizzeria, it would be easy to write Fish House Fistral as another Newquay tourist trap. But the beach shack restaurant is run by Paul Harwood, a chef who spent 14 years cutting his teeth at Rick Stein in Padstow. The avid surfer stocks up daily in Newquay Harbor and concocts a menu inspired by his travels. Take off your wetsuit and join the local surfer community for casual meals of Balinese monkfish and Sri Lankan prawn curry. (Mains from £15.95; thefishhousefistral.com)

Mackerel Sky Seafood Bar

Mackerel Sky Seafood Bar

ONNA BODEN

5. Mackerel Sky Seafood Bar, Newlyn

Minutes from Newlyn Harbour, seafood bar Mackerel Sky puts a street food and tapas twist on fresh fish, crab and jalapeño dishes piled on nachos to a katsu take on the sole . Spaces quickly fill at the small joint, where bar stools and high tables give you a front-row seat to the open kitchen – although the best people-watching opportunities are at the wobbly metal tables outside. ‘outside. A great soundtrack and young chefs add to the vibe of this fun little place. (Tasting plates from £8.50; mackerelskycafe.co.uk)

Shrimps on the Lawn/Farm

6. Prawns on the Lawn/Farm, Padstow

This nomadic restaurant evolves with the seasons. In the summer, you’ll need a car or a sturdy pair of walking boots to find Prawn on the Farm. The white marquee is adorned with lamps and rattan streamers, but it’s the beautiful views over the Camel Estuary that set the scene. In winter the restaurant moves to the center of Padstow. Both iterations serve fantastic locally sourced small plates, as well as whole fish and Padstow lobsters and crabs. (Small plates from £9; prawnonthelawn.com)

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Verdant Seafood Bar combines food and beer

Verdant Seafood Bar combines food and beer

ROBERT HERON

7. The Verdant Seafood Bar, Falmouth

Forget white wine and fish, Verdant Seafood Bar pairs its dishes with beer. The small navy blue restaurant on Quay Street is owned by a brewery, less than five miles from Penryn. Eight rows of kegs and a fridge stocked with unusual bottles, including naturally fermented Mills Brewing Table beer and a whiskey-aged Norwegian stout, ensure there’s something new to try on every visit – as does the seasonal menu, with bites like a hot dog stuffed with lobster rolls and breaded monkfish with Korean barbecue sauce. (Small plates from £3; verdantbrewing.co/pages/seafoodbar)

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